ISU Headlines

Transgender Day of Remembrance film screening, discussion with filmmaker Haworth set Nov. 12 at ISU

Posted November 9, 2009


In honor of Transgender Day of Remembrance, the Janet C. Anderson Gender Resource Center at Idaho State University announces a film screening and community discussion with transgender filmmaker Gwen Haworth. The screening of her award winning film, "She's a Boy I Knew" begins at 6 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 12, in the College of Education Auditorium.

This event is supported through grants from the Idaho Humanities Council and the ISU Cultural Affairs Council and co-sponsorships from the ISU Psychology Department and Genesis Project.

The auto-ethnographic film is not only an exploration into the filmmaker's process of transition from biological male to female, from Steven to Gwen, but also an emotionally charged account of the individual experiences, struggles, and stakes that her two sisters, mother, father, best friend and wife brought to Gwen's transition. Under Haworth's sensitive eye, each stepping stone in the process of transitioning becomes an opportunity to explore her community's and our own underlying assumptions about gender and sexuality.

The film will be followed by a discussion with the filmmaker about trans representation in cinema.

More information about the film is available at http://www.outcast-films.com/films/sabik/index.html.

Held in November of each year, Transgender Day of Remembrance memorializes those who were killed due to anti-transgender hatred or prejudice.  It began in San Francisco in 1999 with a candlelight vigil to remember Rita Hester who was murdered on Nov. 28, 1998.  Her murder remains unsolved. 

The Anderson Center at Idaho State University serves as the focal point on campus for the consideration of gender issues.  In our efforts, we are especially guided by the ideal of diversity which allows us to envision a future free of the limitations imposed by our culture's standard definitions of gender and other categories of difference.

For more information, contact the Anderson Center at (208) 282-2805.