Caving Workshop

 

Course Syllabus
   

 

 

 

 

 

CAVING WORKSHOP (PEAC 1194)

Department of Sport Science & Physical Education, Idaho State University


Caving (Creative Commons Photo)SUMMARY

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Course: Caving Workshop (PEAC 1194)

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Semesters: Spring

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Times: Workshop held in the field for several days - check schedule for dates

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Where: Caves in Idaho

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Instructor: Justin Dayley

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Email: dayljust@isu.edu 

 


COURSE DESCRIPTION

 

This course is designed for students that want to develop the skills necessary to explore non technical caves. The course covers navigation, equipment, rappelling, light sources, emergency preparation, and the history of caving.

 

 

TARGETED STANDARDS

 

The Sports Science and Physical Education Department’s Outdoor Education curriculum at Idaho State is based on a foundation of five nationally recognized standards.  The following standard applies to this course:  

 

Standard #5  Outdoor Education Experiential Skills and Field Experience Outdoor educators understand the techniques, equipment and safety procedures associated with a variety of outdoor skills; have taken ample opportunity to learn, practice and refine outdoor skills; and have gained practical experience in leading outdoor activities and/or teaching outdoor skills.

 

DEFINITION, HISTORY & PHILOSOPHY

Caving Activity Definition: Caving also known as spelunking by some in the United States and occasionally potholing in the United Kingdom—is the recreational pastime of exploring wild (generally non-commercial) cave systems.

 

Caving History Summary:   Caving was pioneered by Édouard-Alfred Martel (1859-1938) who first achieved the descent and exploration of the Gouffre de Padirac, France as early as 1889 and the first complete descent of a 110 meter wet vertical shaft at Gaping Gill, in Yorkshire, England in 1895. He developed his own techniques based on ropes and metallic ladders. Martel visited Kentucky and notably Mammoth Cave National Park in October 1912. Famous US caver Floyd Collins made in the 1920s important explorations in that area. In the 1930s, as caving became increasingly popular, small exploration teams both in the Alps and in the karstic high plateaus of southwest France transformed cave exploration in both a scientific and recreational activity.

 

Caving Philosophy Summary:   Caves have been explored out of necessity (for shelter from the elements or from enemies), out of curiosity or for mystical reasons for thousands of years. However, only in the last century or two has the activity developed into a sophisticated, athletic pastime. In recent decades caving has changed considerably due to the availability of modern protective wear and equipment. It has recently come to be known as an "extreme sport" by some (though not commonly considered as such by its practitioners, who may dislike the term for its perceived connotation of disregard for safety). This workshop will help you to develop your technical skills and environmental ethics to explore caves is the south east Idaho region.

 

COURSE STRUCTURE & STRATEGY


The course is taught one night in the Rendezvous building to prepare students for a weekend field session. The weekend trip allows students to apply the skills they’ve learned in the classroom in a real situation. The course is designed to help students develop skills, form an appreciation for safety, and gain an understanding of caving history and equipment.  The following value statements help guide course strategy:

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES


Objective 1 (Academic Objective): To gain an understanding of the history of caving, caving organizations, caving equipment, and the function and use of accessory equipment. 

Objective 1 Learning Outcomes - By the end of the course, students will:

 

1a. Explain the history of human use of caves and the sport of caving.
1b. Describe the caving organizations currently available.
1c.Explain what equipment is used in caving and its proper application.

 

Objective 2 (Academic Objective):  To develop an appreciation and understanding of the safety procedures involved with caving and an overview of the cave environment .

Objective 2 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will:


2a.  Understand the risks associated with caves, the procedures to minimize and prevent cold injuries.
2b.  Be able to identify common cave hazards including breakdown, fissures, stalagmites, stalactites, sumps, and know the procedures in avoiding these hazards.
2c. Be able to explain how the Leave No Trace principle can be applied to the cave environment.
2d. Understand how communication is used underground and the difficulties involved in cave rescue.


Objective 3 (Motor Skill Objective):  To develop basic skills in caving and desert camping.

Objective 3 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will:

 

3a. Be able to locate cave locations with a GPS and map.
3b. Be able to set up a overnight camp location in a desert region.
3c. Demonstrate various techniques to travel in different caves.
3d. Be able to rappel into a cave with a back up belay.
3e. Be able to use an assisted raise to exit a cave.

 

GRADING


Grades for this course are determined by using a point system.  The final grade is reached by adding points from three components:

Total Number of Points Possible:  100 pts

 

Weekend Caving Trip:  Due to the workshop format of the course the weekend trip is mandatory. If you miss any part of the weekend course you will receive a failing grade. 

 

 

REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES


If you have a diagnosed disability or believe that you have a disability that might require “reasonable accommodation” on the part of the instructor, please call the Director, ADA & Disabilities Resource Center, 282-3599.  As a part of the Americans with Disabilities Act, it is the responsibility of the student to disclose a disability prior to requesting reasonable accommodation.

 

CAVING COURSE SCHEDULE (ALIGNED WITH COURSE OBJECTIVES)

 

Course Segment

Topic and/or Skills

Objectives/Outcomes

Tuesday Evening 6 – 10 pm

Caving history, humans and canes, caving organizations, cave environment, cave ethics, Leave No Trace, common cave emergencies, risk management for cave recreation, equipment discussion, communication, cold injuries

Objective 1, 2 and Learning Outcomes 1a, 1b, 1c, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d

Saturday Morning 8 am - Noon

Navigation using maps and GPS, dessert camping, equipment,

Objective 1, 2 and Learning Outcomes 1a, 1b, 1c, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d

Saturday Afternoon 1– 2 pm

Location of caves using maps and GPS, cave passages, cave travel

Objective 1, 2 and Learning Outcomes 1a, 1b, 1c, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d

Saturday Afternoon 2 – 3:30 pm

Exploration of caves

Objective 1, 2 and Learning Outcomes 1a, 1b, 1c, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3a, 3b, 3c

Saturday Afternoon 3:30 -4:30 pm

Exploration of caves

Objective 1, 2 and Learning Outcomes 1a, 1b, 1c, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3a, 3b, 3c

Saturday Afternoon 4:30 – 5:30 pm

Exploration of caves

Objective 1, 2 and Learning Outcomes 1a, 1b, 1c, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3a, 3b, 3c

Sunday Morning 9:30 - Noon

Exploration of caves

Objective 1, 2 and Learning Outcomes 1a, 1b, 1c, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3a, 3b, 3c

Sunday Afternoon 1-2:30 pm

Exploration of assisted cave

Objective 1, 2 and Learning Outcomes 1a, 1b, 1c, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d, 3e

Sunday Afternoon
2:30 – 5:00 pm

Camp clean up

Objective 2, 3 and Learning Outcomes 2c, 3a, 3b,


 

 


Aim High: Idaho State University Outdoor Education

Outdoor Education Links:

 

Outdoor Education Major

Outdoor Minor Information

Questions & Answers

Brief Descriptions of Outdoor Classes

Great Video on Outdoor Education at Idaho State


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