Outdoor Leadership

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Course Syllabus
   

 

 

 

 

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OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP (PE 3386)

 

Rafting in IdahoDepartment of Sports Science & Physical Education - Idaho State University

 

SUMMARY

 

Course: Outdoor Leadership
(PE 3386 )


Semester: Spring Semester

 

Time:  Tuesdays, 10:00-10:50 AM


Place: Reed Gym 302

 

Instructor:  Justin Dayley


E-mail: dayljust@isu.edu

 

 

Outdoor Leadership: Pointing the Way

 

TEXT  

 

Required text: Martin, Bruce … (et al.) (2006) Outdoor Leadership: theory and practice.  Champaign, Illinois: Human Kinetics.  (Primary source) 
 
Suggested but not required: Priest, S. & Gass M. (2005). Effective Leadership in Adventure Programming 2nd edition.  Champaign, Illinois: Human Kinetics. 

Rohnke, K. & Butler, S. (1995).  Quick silver: Adventure games, initiative problems, trust activities and a guide to effective leadership.  Dubuque, Iowa: Kendal/Hunt Publishing.

 

 

 

CATALOG COURSE DESCRIPTION


Designed to provide candidates with the knowledge to organize and lead outdoor activities. Includes leadership styles, liability, program promotion, planning, safety, and environmental impact. Practical experiences are included.

 

 

TARGETED STANDARDS


The Sports Science and Physical Education Department’s Outdoor Education curriculum at Idaho State is based on a foundation of five national recognized standards.  The following standards apply to this course:  Standard 1 (Content Knowledge), Standard 3 (Safety and Minimal Impact), and Standard 5 (Experiential Skill and Field Experience).

 

Outdoor Dinner for Individuals With Disabilities

 

 

DEFINITION, HISTORY & PHILOSOPHY  

Outdoor Leadership Definition.  Outdoor education can be simply defined as experiential learning in, for, or about the outdoors. The term ‘outdoor education’, however, is used quite broadly to refer to a range of organized activities which take place in a variety of ways in predominantly outdoor environments. Common definitions of outdoor education are difficult to achieve because interpretations vary according to culture, philosophy, and local conditions.
      Outdoor education is often referred to as synonymous with adventure education, adventure programming, and outdoor learning, outdoor school, adventure therapy, adventure recreation, adventure tourism, expeditionary learning, challenge education, experiential education, environmental education, Forest schools and wilderness education. Consensuses about the meaning of these terms are also difficult to achieve. However, outdoor education often uses or draws upon these related elements and/or informs these areas. The hallmark of outdoor education is its focus on the "outdoor" side of this education; whereas adventure education would focus on the adventure side and environmental education would focus on environmental. Wilderness education involves expeditions into wilderness "where man is but a visitor."


Outdoor Leadership History Summary.   Modern outdoor education owes its beginnings to a number of separate initiatives. Organized camping was evident in the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century in Europe, the UK, the USA, Australia, and New Zealand. The Scouting movement, established in 1907 by Robert Baden-Powell, employs non-formal education with an emphasis on practical outdoor activities. The first Outward Bound centre at Aberdovey in Wales was established during the Second World War. The Forest schools of Denmark are examples of European programs with similar aims and objectives.
      A key outdoor education pioneer was Kurt Hahn, a German educator who founded schools such as the Schule Schloss Salem in Germany, Gordonstoun School in Scotland, Atlantic College in Wales, the United World Colleges movement, the Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme (which emphasizes community service, craftsmanship skills, physical skill, and outdoor expeditions), and the Outward Bound movement.

      The second half of the twentieth century saw rapid growth of outdoor education in all sectors (state, voluntary, and commercial) with an ever-widening range of client groups and applications. In this period Outward Bound spread to over 40 countries around the world, including the USA in the 1960s. Other US based outdoor education programs include Project Adventure and the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS). Project Adventure focuses on day use of ropes courses. NOLS uses the outdoor setting to train leaders for outdoor programs and for other settings including training every new US astronaut and 10% of the US Naval Academy. The Association for Experiential Education is a professional association for "experiential" educators. The Wilderness Education Association (WEA) is a consortium of college outdoor education programs with a standard curriculum based on an academic model. (See also North America in the Around the World section.)
     A history of outdoor education in the UK has been documented by Lyn Cook and a history of outdoor education in New Zealand has been published in Pip Lynch's 'Camping in the Curriculum'.


Outdoor Leadership Philosophy Summary.   Philosophy and theory about outdoor education tends to emphasize the effect of natural environments on human beings, the educative role of stress and challenge, and experiential learning.
       One view is that participants are at their "rawest" level when outdoors because they are "stripped" of many of the conveniences of modern life. Participants can become more aware that they are part of a greater ecosystem and are not as bound by social customs and norms. In essence participants can be true to themselves and more able to see others as people regardless of race, class, religion etc. Outdoor education also helps instill the basic elements of teamwork because participants often need to work together and rely on others. For many people a high ropes course or an outdoor activity may stretch their comfort zone and cause them to challenge themselves physically which in turn can lead to challenging oneself mentally.

 

 

COURSE STRUCTURE & STRATEGY


The Outdoor Leadership class is made up of two broad components:  leadership theory and hands-on outdoor skills instruction.  Classroom work takes up the first of the class and consists of information about organizing and coordinating activities in an outdoor setting.  Topics covered include leadership styles, group dynamics, teaching styles, facilitation techniques, adventure game programming, ethics, gender issues, liability, promotion, planning meetings, safety, emergency procedures, and trip evaluation.  During the second half of the class, the course work becomes more pragmatic, and students will have an opportunity to assume leadership roles and/or help teach basic outdoor skills.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES


Objective 1 (Academic Objective): To gain an understanding of the history of Outdoor Leadership, including influential leaders that have shaped the outdoor industry and the conservation movement. 

Objective 1 Learning Outcomes - By the end of the course, students will:


1a. Have knowledge of several outdoor and conservation leaders that have had an influence on the outdoor industry.
1b. Develop  and present project #4 (15 minute presentation) on a outdoor or conservation leaders that have had an influence on the outdoor industry.

Objective 2 (Academic Objective):  To develop group facilitation and presentation skills.

Objective 2 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will:


2a. Present project #4 on an influential outdoor or conservation leader to a group of peers.
2b. Demonstrate the ability to give positive and constructive feedback to peers who are presenting project #4 and explain how this feedback can lead to improved presentations.
2c. Present an initiative activity to a group of peers and explain how the activity can influence a group.

 

Objective 3 (Academic Objective):  To develop practical leadership skills

Objective 3 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will:

 

3a. Demonstrate the ability to complete project #1 (organize an outdoor trip or participate on a trip with the OAC)
3b. Demonstrate the ability to work as a group by completing project #2 (organizing a conservation project) and explain why it is important.

 

Objective 4 (Academic Objective):  To develop an Outdoor Journal of their experiences.

Objective 4 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will:
4a. Demonstrate the ability to keep an outdoor journal and explain how the journal could be useful while working in the outdoor industry.
4b. Explain how an outdoor journal could be a useful tool to attain a job in the outdoor industry.

 

Objective 5 (Academic Objective):  To develop knowledge about the various aspects pertaining to outdoor leadership and the outdoor industry.

Objective 5 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will:
5a. Have an understanding of the foundations of outdoor leadership.
5b.Develop knowledge of outdoor leadership theory.
5c.Have an understanding of outdoor teaching and facilitation.
5d.Develop knowledge of resource and program management.

 

 

COURSE PROJECTS


In addition to regular class readings, five projects are required for the course.  The projects consist of the following:
 
Project #1: Leadership of an Outdoor Activity
 
Plan and organize an outdoor activity.  You have two options:  


Option 1: Organizing an Outdoor Trip with PE 3386.  Trips must be of a common adventure nature where individuals share in the expenses of the trip and must be at least six (6) hours in duration but an overnight trip is strongly encouraged.  Choose activities which are fairly easy and something that other students would enjoy:  hiking, biking, cross-country skiing, canoeing, etc. Class members are encouraged to recruit participants to share in the common adventure experience.  Additionally, all participants must sign a common adventure sign-up sheet, a copy of which is to be turned with your Summary Paper. Requires instructor approval of trip.

Option 2: Participate on an outdoor trip with the OAC.  Trips must be of a cooperative adventure nature where individuals share in the expenses of the trip and must be at least six (6) hours in duration but an overnight trip is strongly encouraged.  Class members are encouraged to recruit participants to share in the cooperative adventure experience.  Additionally, all participants must sign a cooperative adventure sign-up sheet, a copy of which is to be turned with your Summary Paper.  Requires instructor approval of activity. 

Requirements include the following:  


1. You must have everyone on the outing sign a sign-up sheet or liability release form.


2. You can not charge for the trip.  Trip expenses must be shared among the participants.  


3. Report.  A report of the activity, at least three pages long, should be turned in to the Outdoor Adventure Center (1st floor, Student Union) by date indicated by the instructor.  The paper must be typed.  The first two pages should be an over-all summary of the activity.  Include such topics as: a) The date, time, location and duration of the activity;  b) Information on how you prepared for the event or trip; c) What specific activities were a part of the event or trip;  d) What equipment was required; e) What problems did you experienced; f) And finally, what did you learn through the activity.

The last page should be a copy of a sign-up sheet or a liability release form with the signatures of all trip participants.  If you helped with a class, include a list of the students in the class.

 

Project #2: Plan and organize an Outdoor Conservation Project

Plan, organize and conduct one of the following: a conservation project, community clean-up, or a project which helps the outdoor environment.  Sample projects include organizing a work group to do maintenance on a hiking trail (removing downed timber and protecting it from erosion), organizing a crew to plant willows along a stream to improve fish habitat, organizing a group to clean-up a campsite, along a river, or a popular outdoor recreation area. 

Requirements include the following:

1. Before undertaking a project (and if appropriate), obtain approval from the appropriate public land manager.

2. The class will be required to establish a time in which all members of the class can participate.

3. The project should be at least four (4) hours in duration.

4. Document the project by taking before and after photographs.  If you are unable to take photographs, carefully describe the conditions before and after you do your work.

5. Report. Put together a two-page report of your project.  The report must be typed.  Include the location, date, and names of individuals who helped, information on how you planned and organized the activity, and the results of your work.

 


Project #3: Compile an Outdoor Journal

A final requirement of the class is to compile outdoor trip log and/or journal. Trip logs are useful as a resource for planning and organizing outdoor activities--and related experiential activities such as adventure games and team building exercises. They provide you with a personal record of your past outdoor activities. Moreover, they are particularly useful if you ever apply for work in the outdoor field.  Oftentimes, applications for outdoor education jobs require a list of your experiences in the outdoors, and there's no better source of information from which to work as an outdoor journal.

 

For this project, you'll need a notebook.  A good size to use is a notebook with the approximate dimensions of 9" x 6", but you are welcome to select a size and format that you are most comfortable with.  Unlike the reports required for the first two projects, you do not have to provide the journal in a typed form.  In fact, it is recommended that you write out the entries by hand, since the idea is to create something that is convenient and that you'll continue to use in the future.

You can make the journal as fancy as you wish.  It is not required, but, if desired, you can paste in photos or maps, or drawings. Among the material that you hand-in, include one outdoor trip that you've taken sometime in the past, a description of at least two adventure games (ice breakers, initiative tests, or trust activities) that you can use with a group, your entries on the outdoor leadership project and conservation project and any professional-development portfolio activity assignments from the Outdoor Leadership text.

 

In the trip description, include the following:  1) dates;  2) where;  3) what you did;  4) who was with you, along with any other comments you want to add.

 


Projects #1, 2, and 3:  Due Date


The spring is a busy time and weekends go by quickly.  Thus, it's important that you begin working on your projects as early as possible.  All projects must be completed by the weekend prior to Closed Week.  (see above) are due no later than 5:00 pm, Friday prior to Closed Week.  Turn in your reports to the Outdoor Program office, located downstairs in the Student Union Building.

Note:  Closed Week is the week before Finals.  In other words, you need to have your project reports turned in the Friday before Closed Week. Papers handed in late receive an automatic reduction of one grade for each day late.  Anything handed in after Wednesday of Closed Week is given an "F."

 

 

Project #4 Leadership presentation

 

Pick an outdoor leader that has made a significant contribution or is still contributing to the outdoor industry.  Each student will present for 15-20 minutes with a PowerPoint presentation including photos or graphs of the chosen outdoor leader.  Examples of outdoor leaders are Lynn Hill, John Muir, Will Gad, Alex Low, Theodore Roosevelt , Greg Lowe, Greg Child, Paul Pezold, Sir Ernest Shackleton, Sir Edmund Hillary, Merwether Lewis Tenzing Norgay, Yvon Chouinard, Steve House, Gary Fisher, Robert Falcon Scott, Roald Amundsen, John Wesley Powell, Zebulon Pike, William Clark, Lance Armstrong, George Herbert Leigh Mallory, Goran Kropp.

Each student must have their selected outdoor leader approved by the instructor.

 

Project #5 Initiative activity


Each student will select one initiative activity and facilitate the activity for the class participants.  Rescores to find activities include but are not limited to  Rohnke, K. & Butler, S. (1995).  Quick silver: Adventure games, initiative problems, trust activities and a guide to effective leadership.  Dubuque, Iowa: Kendal/Hunt Publishing.  Rohnke .K. (1984). Silver Bullets: A Guide to Initiative Problems, Adventure Games and Trust Activities Dubuque, Iowa: Kendal/Hunt Publishing and  http://wilderdom.com/games/TrustActivities.html. Each student must have their selected activity approved by the instructor before sharing with the class.

 

International Outdoor Leadership

 

 

GRADING


Grades for this course are determined by using a point system.  The final grade is reached by adding points from nine components:

 

Total Number of Points Possible:  1000 pts

 

Grading Example: As an example of how grades are determine, let’s say that a student in the course attends 28 out of the possible 30 total class sessions; and they receive the following grades on the required assignments, quizzes and exams. Here’s how the grade would be calculated:

  • Attendance and Participation  28 x 5 =  140 pts.
  • Leadership Project 100 pts.
  • Conservation Project 100 pts.
  • Outdoor Journal 100 pts.
  • Leadership Presentation 90 pts.
  • Initiative Activity 50 pts.
  • Quizzes 100 pts.
  • Mid Term Exam 100 pts.
  • Final Exam 200 pts.
  • Skill Assessment  45 pts.
  • Written Final  40 pts.

Total Points:  140 + 100 + 100 +100 +90 +50 +100 +100+ 200 = 980
Percentage Grade: 980 / 1000 = 98%
Letter Grade - Using the ISU grading scale (below):  A

 

GRADING SCALE (ISU SCALE)
A         93-100             C+       78-80               D-        63-65
A-       90-92.9            C         75-77                 F          62-below
B+       87-89               C-        72-74
B         84-86               D+       69-71
B-        81-83               D         66-68

 

 

REASONABLE ACCOMODATION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
If you have a diagnosed disability or believe that you have a disability that might require “reasonable accommodation” on the part of the instructor, please call the Director, Center of Services for Students with Disabilities, 282-3599. As a part of the Americans with Disabilities Act, it is the responsibility of the student to disclose a disability prior to requesting reasonable accommodation. 

 

 

OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP COURSE SCHEDULE (ALIGNED WITH COURSE OBJECTIVES)

 

Course Segment

Topics / Skills

Objectives and Learning Outcomes

Session 1

Introduction, Review of Syllabus

Objectives: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d

Session 2

Chapter 1

Objective 1, 5
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 5a

Session 3

Chapter 1, Project #5

Objective: 2, 5
Learning Outcomes: 2b, 2c, 5a

Session 4

Chapter 2, Project #5

Objective: 1, 2, 5
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 2b, 2c, 5a

Session 5

Chapter 3

Objectives: 4, 5
Learning Outcomes: 4a, 4b, 5a

Session 6

Chapter 4

Objectives: 1, 5
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 5b

Session 7

Chapter 5

Objective 3, 5
Learning Outcomes: 3a, 3b, 5b

Session 8

Chapter 6

Objective 5
Learning Outcomes: 5b

Session 9

Chapter 6

Objective 5
Learning Outcomes: 5b

Session 10

Chapter 7

Objective 5
Learning Outcomes: 5b

Session 11

Chapter 7

Objective 5
Learning Outcomes: 5b

Session 12

Chapter 8

Objectives: 5
Learning Outcomes: 5c

Session 13

Chapter 9

Objectives: 5
Learning Outcomes: 5c

Session 14

Review

Objectives: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 5c

Session 15

Mid Term Exam

Objectives: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 5c

Session 16

Chapter 10

Objectives: 5
Learning Outcomes: 5c

Session 17

Chapter 12

Objective 5
Learning Outcomes: 5c

Session 18

Chapter 12

Objectives 5
Learning Outcomes: 5c

Session 19

Chapter 13

Objectives: 5
Learning Outcomes: 5d

Session 20

Chapter 14

Objectives: 5
Learning Outcomes: 5d

Session 21

Chapter 15

Objectives: 5
Learning Outcomes: 5d

Session 22

Chapter 16

Objectives: 5
Learning Outcomes: 5d

Session 23

Chapter 17

Objectives: 5
Learning Outcomes: 5d

Session 24

Project 4

Objectives: 1, 2
Learning Outcomes: 1a. 1b. 2a. 2b. 2c

Session 25

Project 4

Objectives: 1, 2
Learning Outcomes: 1a. 1b. 2a. 2b. 2c

Session 26

Project 4

Objectives: 1, 2
Learning Outcomes: 1a. 1b. 2a. 2b. 2c

Session 27

Project 4

Objectives: 1, 2
Learning Outcomes: 1a. 1b. 2a. 2b. 2c

Session 28

Chapter 11

Objectives: 5
Learning Outcomes: 5c, 5d

Session 29

Chapter 11

Objectives: 5
Learning Outcomes: 5c, 5d

Session 30

Review

Objectives: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d

Session 31

Review

Objectives: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d

Session 32

Review

Objectives: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d

Session 33

Final Exam

Objectives: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d

 


Aim High: Idaho State University Outdoor Education

Outdoor Education Links:

 

Outdoor Education Major

Outdoor Minor Information

Questions & Answers

Brief Descriptions of Outdoor Classes

Great Video on Outdoor Education at Idaho State


 

 

 

 

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