Team Building Leadership

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Course Syllabus
   

 

 

 

 

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TEAM BUILDING LEADERSHIP (PE 2200)

 

Department of Sports Science & Physical Education - Idaho State University

 

Challenge Course - Idaho State UniversitySUMMARY

 

Course: Team Building Leadership (PE 2200 )


Credits: 2 Credits

 

Semester: Fall (First Half of Semester)

 

Time:  Thursdays, 1:00-4:00 PM


Place: Idaho State University Challenge Course

 

Instructor:  Bob Ellis


E-mail: ellirobe@isu.edu

 

 

TEXT 


No text is required, but material and readings come from the following: Quicksilver by Karl Rohnke and Steve Butler, Funn ‘n Games by Karl Rohnke.  Copies are available for checkout in the Outdoor Program Library.

 

 

CATALOG COURSE DESCRIPTION


Trains individuals to facilitate and lead on a challenge course.  Setup and dismantling of an Alpine Tower course, facilitation of large and small team building groups, safety and rescue techniques.  Designed to train participants in pursuit of employment within the challenge course industry. 

 

Challenge Course: Giant Swing

 

 

TARGETED STANDARDS


The Sports Science and Physical Education Department’s Outdoor Education curriculum at Idaho State is based on a foundation of five national recognized standards.  The following standards apply to this course:  Standard 1 (Content Knowledge), Standard 2 (Teaching and Leadership Strategies), Standard 3 (Safety and Minimal Impact), and Standard 5 (Experiential Skill and Field Experience).

 

Challenge Course - Flying!

 

DEFINITION, HISTORY & PHILOSOPHY


Challenge Course Definition:  The term “challenge course” is interchangeable with the terms “rope course,” “ropes challenge course,” and “teams course.”  Whatever name is used, a challenge course consists of ropes and/or structures which present one or more simple or complex problems that must be solved and surmounted by an individual or a group acting as team.  Used for educational, personal development and team building purposes, challenge courses may consist of low elements (on the ground or a few feet above it) or high elements (elevated some distance above the ground).  Idaho State University’s challenge course is called an “Alpine Tower,” and is a 50-foot self-supporting structure made from telephone poles.  The design incorporates both high and low challenge course elements. 


Challenge Course History Summary:   Rope and challenge courses have been used for training purposes by the military for centuries, going as far back as the ancient Greeks.  In the early 1900’s Georges Hébert is credited as originating what we recognize in contemporary terms as a rope course.  Hébert was a French naval officer, and quite naturally the design of his rope courses were based upon sailing riggings.  By 1940’s, the British Outward Bound School was using rope courses in their training programs to better equip young sailors with survival skills for service during World War II.  Borrowing from their British counterparts, Outward Bound schools in the United States first used rope courses for training Peace Corp volunteers in Colorado and Puerto Rico in the 1960’s and then expanded their use to all of its regional schools, incorporating them as a regular part of its outdoor curriculum.  In the early 1970’s, a new organization, Project Adventure, built upon Outward Bound’s success with rope courses, and began to utilize them in public school programs.  From these beginnings, the use of rope courses - and specially built structures such as Alpine Towers – have spread widely and are in use throughout the world. 


Challenge Course Philosophy Summary:   When combined with carefully structured and sequenced programming, challenge courses can be used for educational, developmental and therapeutic purposes.  While much research remains to be done, early findings point that challenge course experiences can enhance self confidence, self esteem, trust, cooperation, teamwork, and social cohesion.  Idaho State’s program abides by “Challenge by Choice” philosophy which means that individuals may freely choose their level of participation and the amount of challenge.  Challenge courses, by their nature, encourage participants to step out of their natural comfort zone, but no one is ever asked to participate in any activity for which they are not ready.

 

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES


Objective 1 (Academic Objective): To gain an understanding of the types of challenge courses, the evolution of course design, the variety and uses of low and high course elements, and the function and use of accessory equipment. 

Objective 1 Learning Outcomes - By the end of the course, students will:


1a. Have an understanding of the development of challenge courses from the earliest use of sailing riggings to self-supporting structures such as the Alpine Tower to recent innovations in the United States and Europe which have resulted multi-featured Adventure Parks.
1b. Understand the function of and the use of course equipment including ropes and cables, group initiative aids and kits, debriefing tools, and other accessories.
1c. Be able to demonstrate the proper use of challenge course safety equipment including harnesses, helmets, belay devices, carabiners, and other safety gear.

 

Objective 2 (Academic Objective):  To develop an appreciation and understanding of the safety procedures involved with challenge courses.

Objective 2 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will:


2a.  Understand the risks associated with challenges courses and the procedures to minimize and prevent accidents.
2b.  Understand the steps involved in conducting (and documenting) regular maintenance and periodic inspections of artificial structures and equipment used in the activities.

 

Objective 3 (Motor Skills Objective):  To actively participate and gain skills in each of the low and high elements, and properly set-up and safely protect challenge course participants.

Objective 3 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will:


3a.  Develop and refine skills in each of the low and high elements initiatives.
3b.  Know how to properly spot low elements initiates.
3c.   Be able to properly use and wear a climbing harness – and recognize and correct improper use of harnesses on others.
3d.  Become experienced in and be able to demonstrate safe belaying technique.

 

Objective 4 (Academic & Teaching Objective):  To develop group leadership, facilitation and debriefing skills related to challenge courses.

Objective 4 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will:


4a.  Know how to prepare, inspect, and assemble the course and group equipment.
4b.  Be able to conduct a safety briefing before groups undertake a challenge course.
4c.  Have the opportunity to instruct individuals and groups in several course initiatives including both high and low elements.
4d. Understand the techniques of proper sequencing of initiatives from start to final briefing.

 

GRADING
Grades for this course are determined by using a point system.  The final grade is reached by adding points from three components:

Grading Example  As an example of how grades are determine, let’s say that a student in the course attends 6 out of the possible 8 total class sessions; and they receive 8 pts. on the midterm field assessment, and 10 pts. on the final field assessment.  Here’s how the grade would be calculated:

  • Attendance and Participation  6 x10 =  60 pts.
  • Midterm  8 pts.
  • Final  10 pts.

Total Points:  60 + 8 + 10 = 78
Letter Grade - Using the ISU grading scale (below):  C+

 

GRADING SCALE (ISU SCALE)
A         93-100             C+        78-80               D-        63-65
A-        90-92.9           C          75-77               F          62-below
B+        87-89               C-        72-74
B          84-86               D+       69-71
B-        81-83               D         66-68

 

REASONABLE ACCOMODATION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
If you have a diagnosed disability or believe that you have a disability that might require “reasonable accommodation” on the part of the instructor, please call the Director, Center of Services for Students with Disabilities, 282-3599. As a part of the Americans with Disabilities Act, it is the responsibility of the student to disclose a disability prior to requesting reasonable accommodation. 

 

 

TEAM BUILDING COURSE SCHEDULE (ALIGNED WITH COURSE OBJECTIVES)

 

Course Segment

Topics / Skills

Objectives and Learning Outcomes

August 29

Introduction, Review of Syllabus

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 2a, 3a

September 5

Background on Experiential Education.  Name games, Icebreakers, and Initiatives.

Objective: 1
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c

September 12

Knots, setting up facility, climbing/swing, and equipment care/storage

Objective: 1
Learning Outcomes: 1b, 1c

September 19

Teaching Belay School

Objectives: 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1b, 1c, 2a, 3b, 3c, 3d

September 26

Risk Management, Facility inspection

Objective 2, 4
Learning Outcomes: 2a, 2b, 4a

October 3

Tower Activities

Objective 3, 4
Learning Outcomes: 3a, 3b, 4b, 4c, 4d

October 10

More for your bag of tricks

Objective 3, 4
Learning Outcomes: 3a, 3b, 4b, 4c, 4d

October 17

Final (Group facilitation)

Objective 4
Learning Outcomes: 4a, 4b, 4c, 4d

 

Alignment of Standards, Objectives and Assessment Methods

Alignment of Standards, Objectives, and Assessment Methods

Program Standard or Goal

Course Objectives

Assessment Method

 

Standard 1: Content Knowledge

Objective 1A: Have an understanding of the development of challenge courses from the earliest use of sailing riggings to self-supporting structures such as the Alpine Tower to recent innovations in the United States and Europe which have resulted multi-featured Adventure Parks.

Written Test

Standard 1: Content Knowledge

Objective 1B:  Understand the function of and the use of course equipment including ropes and cables, group initiative aids and kits, debriefing tools, and other accessories.

Written Test

Standard 1: Content Knowledge

Standard 2: Teaching and Leadership Strategies

Standard 3 (Safety and Minimal Impact)

Objective 3C: Be able to demonstrate the proper use of challenge course safety equipment including harnesses, helmets, belay devices, carabiners, and other safety gear.

Field Assessments

Standard 3 (Safety and Minimal Impact)

Objective 2A: Understand the risks associated with challenges courses and the procedures to minimize and prevent accidents.

Written Test

Standard 3 (Safety and Minimal Impact)

Objective 2B:  Understand the steps involved in conducting (and documenting) regular maintenance and periodic inspections of artificial structures and equipment used in the activities.

Written Test

Standard 5 (Experiential Skills and Field Experience)

Objective 3A:  Develop and refine skills in each of the low and high elements initiatives.

Field Assessment

Standard 5 (Experiential Skills and Field Experience)

Objective 3B: Know how to properly spot low elements initiates.

Field Assessment

Standard 5 (Experiential Skills and Field Experience)

Objective 3C: Be able to properly use and wear a climbing harness - and recognize and correct improper use of harnesses on others.

Field Assessment

Standard 5 (Experiential Skills and Field Experience)

Objective 3D: Become experienced in and be able to demonstrate safe belaying technique.

Field Assessment

Standard 1: Content Knowledge

Standard 3 (Safety and Minimal Impact)

Objective 4A: Know how to prepare, inspect, and assemble the course and group equipment.

Field Assessment

Standard 2: Teaching and Leadership Strategies

Objective 4B: Be able to conduct a safety briefing before groups undertake a challenge course.

Field Assessment

Standard 2: Teaching and Leadership Strategies

Objective 4C: Have the opportunity to instruct individuals and groups in several course initiatives including both high and low elements.

Field Assessment

Standard 1: Content Knowledge

Standard 2: Teaching and Leadership Strategies

Objective 4D: Understand the techniques of proper sequencing of initiatives from start to final briefing.

Written Test

 


Aim High: Idaho State University Outdoor Education

Outdoor Education Links:

 

Outdoor Education Major

Outdoor Minor Information

Questions & Answers

Brief Descriptions of Outdoor Classes

Great Video on Outdoor Education at Idaho State


 

 

 

 

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