Wilderness First Aid

 

Course Syllabus
   

 

 

 

 

 

WILDERNESS FIRST AID (PE 2285)

Department of Sport Science & Physical Education, Idaho State University


First Aid - Accident CareSUMMARY

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Course: Wilderness First Aid
(PE 2285) - 1 Credit

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Semesters: Fall

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Times: Held on a weekend - check schedule for dates

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Where: On Campus

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Instructor: Justin Dayley

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Email: dayljust@isu.edu 

 


COURSE DESCRIPTION

 

This 16-hour national certification course covers first aid and patient care in remote settings. It covers wound and infection management, realigning fractures, dislocations, improvised splinting techniques, patient monitoring, and long-term management problems, and up-to-date information on environmental emergencies.

 

Wilderness First Aid Course

 

 

TARGETED STANDARDS

 

The Sports Science and Physical Education Department’s Outdoor Education curriculum at Idaho State is based on a foundation of five national recognized standards.

 

The following standards apply to this course: Standard 1 (Content Knowledge), Standard 3 (Safety and Minimal Impact), and Standard 5 (Experiential Skill and Field Experience).

 

DEFINITION, HISTORY & PHILOSOPHY

Wilderness First Aid Definition: Wilderness first aid is the specific discipline of First aid which relates to care in remote areas, where emergency medical services will be difficult to obtain or will take a long time to arrive. Locating the victim precedes assessment and intervention and in the case of wilderness response is often a difficult matter. Specialists in white water rescue, mountain rescue, mine disaster response and other specialties are often employed. In some cases, emergency extrication procedures at incidents such as automobile accidents are required before assessment is possible. Once the location of the victim has been determined, a trained responder has been dispatched and successfully reached the victim can the ordinary first aid process begin. Assessment is then enabled and it follows carefully specified protocols which have been refined through a long process of evaluation.

First Aid: Evac

 

First Aid History:   The instances of recorded first aid were provided by religious knights, such as the Knights Hospitaller, formed in the 11th century, providing care to pilgrims and knights, and training other knights in how to treat common battlefield injuries. The practice of first aid fell largely in to disuse during the High Middle Ages, and organized societies were not seen again until in 1859 Jean-Henri Dunant organized local villagers to help victims of the Battle of Solferino, including the provision of first aid.

 

Four years later, four nations met in Geneva and formed the organization which has grown into the Red Cross, with a key stated aim of "aid to sick and wounded soldiers in the field". This was followed by the formation of St. John Ambulance in 1877, based on the principles of the Knights Hospitaller, to teach first aid, and numerous other organization joined them with the term first aid first coined in 1878 as civilian ambulance services spread as a combination of "first treatment" and "national aid “in large railway centers and mining districts as well as with police forces.

 

First aid training began to spread through the empire through organizations such as St. John, often starting, as in the UK, with high risk activities such as ports and railways.

 

Many developments in first aid and many other medical techniques have been driven by wars, such as in the case of the American Civil War, which prompted Clara Barton to organize the American Red Cross. Today, there are several groups that promote first aid, such as the military and the Scouting movement. New techniques and equipment have helped make today’s first aid simple and effective.

 

First Aid Philosophy Summary:   Basic principles, such as knowing to use an adhesive bandage or applying direct pressure on a bleed, are often acquired passively through life experiences. However, to provide effective, life-saving first aid interventions requires instruction and practical training. This is especially true where it relates to potentially fatal illnesses and injuries, such as those that require cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR); these procedures may be invasive, and carry a risk of further injury to the patient and the provider. As with any training, it is more useful if it occurs before an actual emergency, and in many countries, emergency ambulance dispatchers may give basic first aid instructions over the phone while the ambulance is on the way. Training is generally provided by attending a course, typically leading to certification. Due to regular changes in procedures and protocols, based on updated clinical knowledge, and to maintain skill, attendance at regular refresher courses or re-certification is often necessary

 

COURSE STRUCTURE & STRATEGY


The outdoor industry standard for wilderness medicine training is the 16-hour Wilderness First Aid (WFA) Course. Those who may consider this course include backcountry travelers on extended outings, guides, camp nurses, pilots, sportsman, residents of rural communities, commercial fisherman and workers or researchers at remote sites. The WFA includes subjects pertinent to backcountry settings and remote locations where providing care for injured or ill persons can extend for hours or days. Students receive training in the most current medical treatment strategies for common medical problems, traumatic injuries, and problems arising from environmental exposure. Emphasis is placed on thorough patient assessment, attention to detail and development of judgment through mock scenarios and skills practice.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES


Objective 1 (Academic Objective): To gain an understanding of the Wilderness First Aid patient assessment system. 


Objective 1 Learning Outcomes - By the end of the course, students will:

1a. Be able to demonstrate how to perform an initial assessment on a patient. 
1b. Be able to perform a head to toe exam.
1c. Assess vitals for a patient.
1d. Demonstrate the ability to collect SAMPLE history from a patient.
1e. Be able to demonstrate both a verbal and written SOAP note.

Objective 2 (Academic Objective):  To develop an understanding of making an evacuation decision for a patient in a remote setting.


Objective 2 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will:

2a.  Be able to explain how to prevent common outdoor emergencies.
2b.  Explain the criteria for a participant to be able to stay and play in the field after an outdoor injury.
2c. Be able to list the criteria for an evacuation of a patient from a remote environment.
2d. Be able to list the criteria for rapid evacuation of a patient from a remote environment.

Objective 3 (Motor Skill Objective):  To develop basic, practical First Aid skills.


Objective 3 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will:

3a.  Demonstrate how to asses and treat various athletic injures including assessment of usability.
3b. Demonstrate how to asses and treat a patient with a suspected spinal cord injury.
3c.Demonstrate how to asses and treat patients with various types of wilderness would.
3d. Demonstrate assessment and treatment of environmental emergencies
3e. Demonstrate how to assess and treat patients who have medical illnesses.

 

GRADING


Grades for this course are determined by using a point system.  The final grade is reached by adding points from three components:

Total Number of Points Possible:  100 pts

 

 

REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES


If you have a diagnosed disability or believe that you have a disability that might require “reasonable accommodation” on the part of the instructor, please call the Director, ADA & Disabilities Resource Center, 282-3599.  As a part of the Americans with Disabilities Act, it is the responsibility of the student to disclose a disability prior to requesting reasonable accommodation.

 

CAVING COURSE SCHEDULE (ALIGNED WITH COURSE OBJECTIVES)

 

Course Segment

Topics / Scenarios / Exercises

Objectives and Learning Outcomes

Day One

 

 

Day 1: 8:00 – 8:30 am

Intro to Course

Objectives 1,
Learning Outcomes: 1a

Day 1: 8:30 – 8:45 am

Wild vs. Urban

Objectives 1,
Learning Outcomes: 1a

Day 1: 8:45 – 9:30 am

Initial

Objectives 1,
Learning Outcomes: 1a

Day 1: 9:30 – 10:30 am

Exam

Objectives 1,
Learning Outcomes: 1b

Day 1: 10:30 – 10:45 am

Break

 

Day 1: 10:45 – 11:15 am

Vitals

Objectives 1,
Learning Outcomes: 1c

Day 1: 11:15 – 11:45 am

Documentation

Objectives 1,
Learning Outcomes: 1e, 1d

Day 1: 11:45 – 12:00 am

Scenario

Objectives 1,
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e

Day 1: 12:00 – 1:00 pm

Lunch

 

Day 1: 1:00 – 2:00 pm

Spine Mechanics & Management

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3b

Day 1: 2:00 – 2:30 pm

Head

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3b, 3c

Day 1: 2:30 – 3:15 pm

Shock

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3e

Day 1: 3:15 – 3:30 pm

Break

 

Day 1: 3:30 – 4:45 pm

Wounds

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3b, 3c

Day 1: 4:40 – 5:00 pm

Burns

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3b, 3c

Day Two

 

 

Day 2: 8:00 – 8:30 am

Scenario

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3b, 3c

Day 2: 8:30 – 9:00 am

FSA

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3b

Day 2: 9:00 – 9:45 am

Athletic Injuries

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3a

Day 2: 9:45 – 10:00 am

Break

 

Day 2: 10:15 – 11:00 am

Fractures

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3a

Day 2: 11:00 – 11:30 am

Dislocations

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3a

Day 2: 11:30 – 12:00 am

Heat Injuries

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3d

Day 2: 12:00 -  1:00 pm

Lunch

 

Day 2: 1:00 -  2:15 pm

Cold / Frostbite

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3d

Day 2: 2:15 -  2:35 pm

Lightening

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3d

Day 2: 2:35 -  3:05 pm

Altitude

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3d

Day 2: 3:05 -  3:35 pm

Unresponsive Patients

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3e

Day 2: 3:35 -  3:45 pm

Break

 

Day 2: 3:45 -  4:15 pm

Abdomen

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3e

Day 2: 4:15 -  4:45 pm

Anaphylaxis

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3e

Day 2: 4:45 -  5:00 pm

First Aid Kit Contents – Course Evaluation

Objectives 1, 2, 3
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 3c

 

 


 

 


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