Advanced Rock Climbing

 

Course Syllabus
   

 

 

 

 

 

ADVANCED ROCK CLIMBING SAFETY (PE 3383) SYLLABUS
Department of Sport Science & Physical Education, Idaho State University

 

Who Seeks Shall FindSUMMARY

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Course:  PE 3383 Advanced Rock Climbing Safety

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Instructor:  Peter Joyce

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Email:  joycpete@isu.edu 

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Credits:  2                                                 

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Semester:  2nd  Half - Spring

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Times: 1 - 4 pm

 


COURSE TEXT / READINGS

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Self Rescue by David Fasulo. (Recommended)

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Climbing Self Rescue by Andy Tyson and Molly Loomis (recommended)

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Accidents in North American Mountaineering, Annual Report of the Safety Committee of the American Alpine Club. Case study handout

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION


A comprehensive examination of climbing safety to include anchor building, self rescue, belaying, advanced knot tying, case history review, and impact forces.

Prerequisite: PEAC 176A Beginning Rock Climbing or instructors approval.

 

TARGETED STANDARDS


Outdoor Education Emphasis Objective #3 Outdoor Education Safety Component  To conduct outdoor activities safely in the outdoors with minimal impact to the environment. Course stresses safe use of the outdoors.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES


Objective 1 (Academic Objective): To gain an understanding of forces generated on the climbing system when a climber takes a fall; and what steps can be taken to minimize those forces. Students will be required to write a research paper, minimum of five pages, to include at least three resources meets this objective.


Objective 1 Learning Outcomes - By the end of the course, students will . . .

1a. Explain what an impact forces is as it relates to the rock climbing activity; and how to calculate an impact force.

 

1b. Explain what a fall factor is as it relates to the rock climbing activity; and how to calculate a fall factor. 1c. Describe several ways in which impact forces and fall factors can be reduced during the rock climbing activity.

Objective 2 (Academic Objective):  To gain an understanding of the proper techniques for using rock climbing equipment: ropes, mechanical belay devices, carabinerr, anchors. Understand the limitations of rock climbing equipment.


Objective 2 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will . . .

2a.  Demonstrate the correct uses of rock climbing equipment.


2b.  Be able to build a top rope anchor system.


2c.  Explain the differences between and when to use a static and dynamic rope.


2d.  Explain the limitations and care of rock climbing equipment.

Objective 3 (Academic Objective):  To understand the importance of reading accident reports. Students will be required to read and evaluate an accident case study.


Objective 3 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will . . .

3a.  Explain where to find accident case studies.


3b.  Describe what can be learned from reading an accident case study.

Objective 4 (Motor Skill Objective):  To understand the principles of knot tying and be able to tie several friction hitches, knots used for load transfers and other miscellaneous knots.


Objective 4 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will . . .

4a.  Explain the principles of knot tying.


4b.  Demonstrate the correct technique of tying a a Prusik, Kleimheist, and autoblock hitches.


4c.  Demonstrate the correct technique of tying a Munter hitch and mule block.


4d.  Demonstrate the correct technique of tying a girth and clove hitches; a lovers (double fisherman’s) and the figure eight follow through knots.

 

Objective 5 (Motor Skill Objective):  To be able to rappel with an injured climber.


Objective 5 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will . . .

5a.  Explain the procedure of rappelling with an injured climber.


5b.  Describe three ways to belay a rappelling climber.


5c.  Demonstrate the techniques of an assisted rappel with an injured climber.


5d. Demonstrate passing a knot while rappelling.

 

Objective 6 (Motor Skill Objective):  To be able to escape the belay system while under the load of a climber; conduct a pick off of the climber.


Objective 6 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will . . .

6a.  Explain the procedure of escaping the belay system; and pick off of a climber.


6b.  Demonstrate the techniques of escaping the belay system while under the load of a climber.


6c.  Demonstrate a “pick off” of a stuck climber.

 

Objective 7 (Motor Skill Objective):  To be understand the different types of  belay systems; the different types of climbing site management; and how to lower and haul up a climber from the top of a cliff.


Objective 7 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will . . .

7a.  Explain the three types of belay systems.


7b.  Explain the differences of a top and bottom managed climbing site.


7c.  Explain the procedure of lowering a climber from the top of a cliff.


7d.  Demonstrate the techniques of a direct, indirect, and redirected belay system.


7e.  Demonstrate the techniques used to lower a climber from the top of a cliff.
7f.  Demonstrate the techniques used to haul up a climber from the top of a cliff.

 

Objective 8 (Motor Skill Objective):  To be able construct a top rope anchor using fixed anchors and “traditional” anchor building equipment.


Objective 8 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will . . .

8a.  Describe the principles of building a top rope anchor.


8b.  Demonstrate building a top rope anchor using “fixed anchors”.


8c.  Demonstrate building a top rope anchor using “traditional” anchor building equipment.

 

Objective 9 (Motor Skill Objective):  To be understand the different methods (improvised and mechanical) of ascending a rope .


Objective 9 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will . . .

9a.  Explain the procedures of ascending a rope.


9e.  Demonstrate the techniques used to ascend a rope using improvised methods.


9e.  Demonstrate the techniques used to ascend a rope using mechanical devices.

 

GRADING


Grades for this course are determined by using a point system.  The final grade is reached by adding points from three components:

Total Number of Points Possible:  200 pts

 

Grading scale  A 93-100, A-90-92, B+ 88-89, B 84-87, B- 80-83, C+ 78-79, C 74-77, C-70-73, D+ 68-69, D 64-67, D- 60-63, F  below 60.

 

REASONABLE ACCOMODATION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES


If you have a diagnosed disability or believe that you have a disability that might require “reasonable accommodation” on the part of the instructor, please call the Director, Center of Services for Students with Disabilities, 282-3599. As a part of the Americans with Disabilities Act, it is the responsibility of the student to disclose a disability prior to requesting reasonable accommodation. 

 

 

COURSE SCHEDULE (ALIGNED WITH COURSE OBJECTIVES)

 

Course Segment

Topics / Skills

Objectives and Learning Outcomes

1

Introduction; Knots. Escaping the belay system

Objectives 2, 4, 6
Learning Outcomes: 2a, 2c, 4a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 6a, 6b

2

Ascending, mechanical and improvised;

Objectives 2, 3, 4, 9
Learning Outcomes: 2a, 4b, 9a, 9b, 9c

3

Rappelling, assisted, passing a knot; Accident case study assignment due

Objectives 2, 4, 5
Learning Outcomes: 2a, 4b, 4d, 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d

4

Pick off scenario

Objectives 2, 4, 6,  7
Learning Outcomes: 2a,  4b, 4c, 4d,  6b, 6c, 7a, 7b, 7d,

5

Rescue scenario

Objectives 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9
Learning Outcomes: 2a, 4a, 4b, 4c, 5c, 5d, 6b, 7d, 9e

6

Anchor building, placing gear, Impact forces assignment due

Objectives 1, 2, 4, 8
Learning Outcomes: 1a, 1b, 1c, 2a, 2b,   4d, 8a, 8b, 8c

7

Anchor building, simple hauling systems, and lowering

Objectives 2, 4, 7, 8
Learning Outcomes: 2a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 7b, 7c, 7d, 7e, 7f, 8b, 8c

 

 

EQUIPMENT


All equipment for the class will be provided with the exception of climbing shoes. While class is held in the Reed Gym Climbing Wall gear is available through check-out at the equipment room. Reed Gym Climbing Wall gear is not to be checked out for outdoor use. Students are invited to use their own personal gear as long as it is serviceable and meets the instructor’s approval. Shoes may be rented for outdoor use from the Wilderness Equipment Rental Center in the SUB, 282-2945.

 

EVALUATION OF COURSE AND INSTRUCTOR


The College of Education and Outdoor Program course evaluation forms will be distributed during the last scheduled class.

 


Aim High: Idaho State University Outdoor Education

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