Mountain Biking
.

.

Course Syllabus
   

 

 

Mountain Bike

 

 

MOUNTAIN BIKING (PEAC 1181)
Department of Sports Science & Physical Education - Idaho State University

 

SUMMARY

 

Mountain BikingCourse: Mountain Biking (PE 1181 )


Semester: Spring & Fall Semesters (Half Semester)

 

Time:  Wednesdays, 1-4 PM


Place: Nearby Mountain Biking Trails

 

Instructor:  Justin Dayley


E-MAIL: dayljust@isu.edu

 


CATALOG COURSE DESCRIPTION

 

Includes topics on mountain biking. Combines a series of indoor lectures with practical outdoor riding experiences. Topics include riding techniques, clothing, equipment, safety and bike maintenance.

 

 

TARGETED STANDARDS


The Sports Science and Physical Education Department’s Outdoor Education curriculum at Idaho State is based on a foundation of five national recognized standards.  The following standards apply to this course:  Standard 1 (Content Knowledge), Standard 3 (Safety and Minimal Impact), and Standard 5 (Experiential Skill and Field Experience).

 

 

DEFINITION, HISTORY & PHILOSOPHY

Mountain Biking Activity Definition.  This activity includes traversing of rocks and washouts, and steep declines, on dirt trails, logging roads, and other unpaved environments. These bicycles need to be able to withstand the stresses of off-road use with obstacles such as logs and rocks. Most mountain bikes use wheels with rims which are 559mm in ISO sizing, colloquially referred to as "26-inch", although the term is inaccurate as it covers too many rim and tire sizes to be meaningful. Wheels used on mountain bikes usually use wide, knobby tires for good traction on uneven terrain and shock absorption. Since the mid-1990s, front wheel suspension has become the norm and since the late 1990s, full front and rear suspension has become increasingly common.

 

Mountain Biking History Summary.  The history of the mountain bike includes contributions from cycle-cross in Europe and the Roughstuff Fellowship in the UK. The name "mountain bike" first appeared in print in 1966 as "mountain bicycle". The mountain bike was a modified heavy cruiser bicycle used for freewheeling down mountain trails. The sport became popular in the 1970s in Marin county, California, USA. The 2007 documentary film, Klunkerz: A Film About Mountain Bikes, looks at this period of off-road cycling in detail. However, it was not until the late 1970s and early 1980s that road bicycle companies started to manufacture mountain bicycles using high-tech lightweight materials, such as M4 aluminum, although in recent years, titanium and carbon fiber frames have become more common but can be very expensive. The first mass production mountain bike was the Specialized Stumpjumper, first produced in 1981. Throughout the 1990s and 2000s, mountain biking moved from a little-known sport to a mainstream activity.

 

Mountain Biking Philosophy Summary.  There are several different styles of mountain biking, usually defined by the terrain, and therefore bikes employed. Styles of mountain bike riding and mountain bikes have evolved rapidly in recent years leading to terms such as Free ride and "Trail bike" being used to categorize mountain bikes.

Mountain Bike

COURSE STRUCTURE & STRATEGY


The course is designed to help students develop skills, form an appreciation for safety, and gain an understanding of mountain biking history and equipment.  The following value statements help guide course strategy:

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES


Objective 1 (Academic Objective): To gain an understanding of the history of mountain biking, route finding, and recognition of hazards. 


Objective 1 Learning Outcomes - By the end of the course, students will:


1a. Be able to explain the history of mountain biking and new trends in the sport.
1b. Demonstrate how to use a map and compass for route finding and navigation while mountain biking.
1c. Explain where at least two sources can be located to provide maps and information about rides.
1d. Explain the common dangers associated with mountain biking and ways in which the hazards can be mitigated.

 

Objective 2 (Motor Skill Objective):  To develop an understanding of the use of a mountain bike and other supporting equipment.


Objective 2 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will:

 

2a. Be able to explain the parts of a mountain bike.
2b. Demonstrate the proper technique for shifting to prevent drive train damage.
2c. Demonstrate proper adjustment of brakes.
2d. Demonstrate the proper method of changing a tire.
2e. Explain the various types of equipment and clothing used while mountain biking. 
2f. Explain what types of repair, first aid and survival equipment that should be carried during a mountain bike ride..

 

Objective 3 (Motor Skill Objective):  To develop basic skills in riding a mountain bike in technical terrrain.

Objective 3 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will:


3a. Demonstrate how to descend a hill.
3b. Demonstrate how to properly climb a hill. 
3c. Explain and demonstrate bike body separation.
3d. Explain how to properly stop a mountain bike.

GRADING


Grades for this course are determined by using a point system.  The final grade is reached by adding points from three components:

Total Number of Points Possible:  100 pts

 

Grading Example

 

As an example of how grades are determine, let’s say that a student in the course attends 7 out of the possible 8 total class sessions; and they receive  25pts. on the skill assessment test.  Here’s how the grade would be calculated:

  • Attendance and Participation  7 x 9.38 =  65.66 pts.
  • Skill Assessment  25 pts.

Total Points:  65.66 + 25 = 90.66
Percentage Grade: 90.66 / 100 = 90.66%
Letter Grade - Using the ISU grading scale (below):  A-

 

GRADING SCALE (ISU SCALE)
A         93-100             C+       78-80.9            D-        63-65.9
A-        90-92.9            C         75-77.9            F          62.9-below
B+       87-89.9            C-        72-74.9
B         84-86.9            D+       69-71.9
B-        81-83.9            D         66-68.9

 

 

REASONABLE ACCOMODATION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

 

If you have a diagnosed disability or believe that you have a disability that might require “reasonable accommodation” on the part of the instructor, please call the Director, Center of Services for Students with Disabilities, 282-3599. As a part of the Americans with Disabilities Act, it is the responsibility of the student to disclose a disability prior to requesting reasonable accommodation. 

 

 

 

MOUNTAIN BIKING COURSE SCHEDULE (ALIGNED WITH COURSE OBJECTIVES)

 

Course Segment

Topic and/or Skills

Objectives/Outcomes

Session 1

Introduction to Mountain biking, rules, bike adjustment, equipment, technical riding drills

Objective 1, 2, 3 and Learning Outcomes 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e, 2f, 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d,

Session 2

Braking, high speed cornering, slow speed cornering, manuals, descending, climbing, trail ride at City Creek

Objective 1, 2, 3 and Learning Outcomes 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e, 2f, 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d,

Session 3

Trail repair, brake adjustment, chain repair, trail ride at Valve House trail

Objective 1, 2, 3 and Learning Outcomes 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e, 2f, 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d,

Session 4

Planning a bike ride, hydration, nutrition, trail ride at West Fork

Objective 1, 2, 3 and Learning Outcomes 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e, 2f, 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d,

Session 5

Cadence, riding in a group, ride at Gibson Jack

Objective 1, 2, 3 and Learning Outcomes 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e, 2f, 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d,

Session 6

Downhill techniques, ride at Corral Creek

 

Objective 1, 2, 3 and Learning Outcomes 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e, 2f, 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d,

Session 7

History of mountain biking, trail ride at east fork

 

Objective 1, 2, 3 and Learning Outcomes 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e, 2f, 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d,

Session 8

Skills assessment, ride at City Creek

Objective 1, 2, 3 and Learning Outcomes 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e, 2f, 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d,

 

 

 

 


 

Aim High: Idaho State University Outdoor Education

Outdoor Education Links:

 

Outdoor Education Major

Outdoor Minor Information

Questions & Answers

Brief Descriptions of Outdoor Classes

Great Video on Outdoor Education at Idaho State


 

 

 

 

___________________

 

 

We have subsidiary sites for Idaho State Outdoor Education at the following:

 

AlterVista

eWeb

Google Sites

Facebook

Word Press

 

 

 

Top of Page