Advanced Rock Climbing Workshop

 

Course Syllabus
   

 

 

Climbing - Tied In

 

 

ADVANCED ROCK CLIMBING WORKSHOP

PE 4441 or PE 5551 - OR Available as a Non-credit Course
Department of Sport Science & Physical Education, Idaho State University

 

Rock Climbing WorkshopSUMMARY

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Course:  PE 4441 or PE 5552 - Advanced Rock Climbing Workshop

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Instructor:  Peter Joyce

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Email:  joycpete@isu.edu 

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Credits:  1                                                 

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Semester: Summer - Check university schedule for exact dates - or drop an email to Peter Joyce (email address, above)

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Course Format: Held as a 5-day camp-out workshop at City of Rocks

 


COURSE TEXT / READINGS

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Self Rescue by David Fasulo. (Recommended)

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Climbing Self Rescue by Andy Tyson and Molly Loomis (recommended)

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Accidents in North American Mountaineering, Annual Report of the Safety Committee of the American Alpine Club. Case study handout

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION


The Advance Rock Climbing Workshop is a week long workshop devoted to advancing and refining climbing techniques. Topics include: using and placing rock protection, setting advance belay anchors, refining lead and aid climbing techniques, and minimizing environmental impact.  Prerequisite: PEAC 1176A Beginning Rock Climbing or instructor's approval.

 

City of Rocks

 

TARGETED STANDARDS


Outdoor Education Emphasis Objective #3 Outdoor Education Safety Component  To conduct outdoor activities safely in the outdoors with minimal impact to the environment. Course stresses safe use of the outdoors.

 

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES


Objective 1 (Academic Objective): To gain an understanding of forces generated on the climbing system when a climber takes a fall; and what steps can be taken to minimize those forces. Students will be required to write a research paper, minimum of five pages, to include at least three resources meets this objective.


Objective 1 Learning Outcomes - By the end of the course, students will . . .

1a. Explain what an impact forces is as it relates to the rock climbing activity; and how to calculate an impact force.

 

1b. Explain what a fall factor is as it relates to the rock climbing activity; and how to calculate a fall factor. 1c. Describe several ways in which impact forces and fall factors can be reduced during the rock climbing activity.

Objective 2 (Academic Objective):  To gain an understanding of the proper techniques for using rock climbing equipment: ropes, mechanical belay devices, carabinerr, anchors. Understand the limitations of rock climbing equipment.


Objective 2 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will . . .

2a.  Demonstrate the correct uses of rock climbing equipment.


2b.  Be able to build a top rope anchor system.


2c.  Explain the differences between and when to use a static and dynamic rope.


2d.  Explain the limitations and care of rock climbing equipment.

Objective 3 (Academic Objective):  To understand the importance of reading accident reports. Students will be required to read and evaluate an accident case study.


Objective 3 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will . . .

3a.  Explain where to find accident case studies.


3b.  Describe what can be learned from reading an accident case study.

Objective 4 (Motor Skill Objective):  To understand the principles of knot tying and be able to tie several friction hitches, knots used for load transfers and other miscellaneous knots.


Objective 4 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will . . .

4a.  Explain the principles of knot tying.


4b.  Demonstrate the correct technique of tying a a Prusik, Kleimheist, and autoblock hitches.


4c.  Demonstrate the correct technique of tying a Munter hitch and mule block.


4d.  Demonstrate the correct technique of tying a girth and clove hitches; a lovers (double fisherman’s) and the figure eight follow through knots.

 

Objective 5 (Motor Skill Objective):  To be able to rappel with an injured climber.


Objective 5 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will . . .

5a.  Explain the procedure of rappelling with an injured climber.


5b.  Describe three ways to belay a rappelling climber.


5c.  Demonstrate the techniques of an assisted rappel with an injured climber.


5d. Demonstrate passing a knot while rappelling.

 

Objective 6 (Motor Skill Objective):  To be able to escape the belay system while under the load of a climber; conduct a pick off of the climber.


Objective 6 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will . . .

6a.  Explain the procedure of escaping the belay system; and pick off of a climber.


6b.  Demonstrate the techniques of escaping the belay system while under the load of a climber.


6c.  Demonstrate a “pick off” of a stuck climber.

 

Objective 7 (Motor Skill Objective):  To be understand the different types of  belay systems; the different types of climbing site management; and how to lower and haul up a climber from the top of a cliff.


Objective 7 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will . . .

7a.  Explain the three types of belay systems.


7b.  Explain the differences of a top and bottom managed climbing site.


7c.  Explain the procedure of lowering a climber from the top of a cliff.


7d.  Demonstrate the techniques of a direct, indirect, and redirected belay system.


7e.  Demonstrate the techniques used to lower a climber from the top of a cliff.
7f.  Demonstrate the techniques used to haul up a climber from the top of a cliff.

 

Objective 8 (Motor Skill Objective):  To be able construct a top rope anchor using fixed anchors and “traditional” anchor building equipment.


Objective 8 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will . . .

8a.  Describe the principles of building a top rope anchor.


8b.  Demonstrate building a top rope anchor using “fixed anchors”.


8c.  Demonstrate building a top rope anchor using “traditional” anchor building equipment.

 

Objective 9 (Motor Skill Objective):  To be understand the different methods (improvised and mechanical) of ascending a rope .


Objective 9 Learning Outcomes – By the end of the course, students will . . .

9a.  Explain the procedures of ascending a rope.


9e.  Demonstrate the techniques used to ascend a rope using improvised methods.


9e.  Demonstrate the techniques used to ascend a rope using mechanical devices.

 

COSTS

 

The instructor can provide you with an informational sheet which itemizes the workshop fee.  The workshop fee covers climbing equipment, transportation and instructional materials.  It does not, however, include food costs.

 

 

FOOD ARRANGEMENTS

 

We will buy food and cook dinners as a group using Dutch ovens.   Workshop participants should plan on sharing food expenses which will run approximately $40.00 per person in addition to the workshop fee.

 

 

EQUIPMENT

 

Group climbing equipment will be provided. It is recommended that you use your personal climbing equipment (shoes, harness, belay device, protection) if you have it. If you have no personal equipment, these items will be provided for you. Shoes can be rented through the ISU Wilderness Rental Center.

 

 

HOUSING

 

This course will be held at the City of Rocks National Reserve, and we will be camping out. No camping equipment will be provided, but if you need anything, it is available at ISU's Wilderness Equipment Rental Center.

 

 

REASONABLE ACCOMODATION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES


If you have a diagnosed disability or believe that you have a disability that might require “reasonable accommodation” on the part of the instructor, please call the Director, Center of Services for Students with Disabilities, 282-3599. As a part of the Americans with Disabilities Act, it is the responsibility of the student to disclose a disability prior to requesting reasonable accommodation. 

 

 

 


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